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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
  1. Mission to Jupiter's icy moon confirmed
    An icy ocean world in our solar system that could tell us more about the potential for life on other worlds is coming into focus with confirmation of the Europa Clipper mission's next phase.
  2. A single gene determines whether a fly has a good sense of sight or a good sense of smell
    Trade-offs in the sizes of visual and olfactory organs are a common feature of animal evolution, but the underlying genetic and developmental mechanisms have not been clear. A study reveals that a single DNA variant that affects the timing of sensory organ development in fruit flies could explain the size trade-off between eyes and antennae, potentially providing a quick route to behavioral changes and adaptation.
  3. Genes tell the story of how the Asian tiger mosquito spread
    Over the last 40 years, the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, has invaded every continent thanks to the transportation of its eggs via human trade and transportation. Researchers have now used the genomes of the mosquitoes to track the history of the invasion and expansion of the species through Albania, Italy, and Greece.
  4. Lasers enable engineers to weld ceramics, no furnace required
    Smartphones that don't scratch or shatter. Metal-free pacemakers. Electronics for space and other harsh environments. These could all be made possible thanks to a new ceramic welding technology. The process works in ambient conditions and uses less than 50 watts of laser power, making it more practical than current ceramic welding methods that require heating the parts in a furnace.
  5. Memory T cells shelter in bone marrow, boosting immunity in mice with restricted diets
    Even when taking in fewer calories and nutrients, humans and other mammals usually remain protected against infectious diseases they have already encountered. This may be because memory T cells, which are located throughout the body and required to maintain immune responses to infectious agents. A new study in mice also found that animals undergoing dietary restriction were better protected against tumors and bacterial infections than animals with unrestricted diets.